Used Theater Drapes

Used theater drapes – Bamboo shades privacy – Wholesale blinds

Used Theater Drapes

used theater drapes

    theater

  • A building or outdoor area in which plays and other dramatic performances are given
  • a building where theatrical performances or motion-picture shows can be presented; "the house was full"
  • field: a region in which active military operations are in progress; "the army was in the field awaiting action"; "he served in the Vietnam theater for three years"
  • The activity or profession of acting in, producing, directing, or writing plays
  • A play or other activity or presentation considered in terms of its dramatic quality
  • dramaturgy: the art of writing and producing plays

    drapes

  • Arrange (cloth or clothing) loosely or casually on or around something
  • Adorn, cover, or wrap (someone or something) loosely with folds of cloth
  • Let (oneself or a part of one's body) rest somewhere in a casual or relaxed way
  • (drape) arrange in a particular way; "drape a cloth"
  • (drape) the manner in which fabric hangs or falls; "she adjusted the drape of her skirt"
  • (drape) curtain: hanging cloth used as a blind (especially for a window)

used theater drapes – Taupe Velvet

Taupe Velvet home theater Curtains / Drapes / Panels Curtain Length: 96 Inches
Taupe Velvet home theater Curtains / Drapes / Panels Curtain Length: 96 Inches

Luxuriously soft to the touch! Rich, full color
and smart styling will bring warmth, welcome and a handsome elegance to a room!

Velvet curtains have a luxuriant, rich look and they are heavy which is great
for keeping the light out and the heat in. Velvet refers to the soft, furry
covering on deer’s antlers and velvet-effect material is produced from woven
fabrics made with cotton or man-made fibers such as polyester. Velvet has a
soft, deep pile which feels almost furry when you brush hand over it and gives
depth and richness to the color with strong contrast between light and dark.
Velvet curtains are ideal for bedrooms as they do keep the room completely dark
when they are drawn.

Claremont Theater Building

Claremont Theater Building
Harlem Heights, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States

The Claremont Theater building is one of the oldest structures in New York City planned specifically to exhibit motion pictures, originally called “photoplays.” Located in north Manhattanville, at the southeast corner of Broadway and 135th Street, the theater opened in November 1914. Commissioned by Arlington C. Hall and Harvey

M. Hall of the Wayside Realty Company, it was designed in the neo-Renaissance style by Gaetano Ajello, an architect best-known for apartment buildings on Manhattan’s Upper West Side. The building has three distinct fronts, including a clipped corner facade where the auditorium’s entrance was originally located. This distinctive arrangement enhanced the theater’s visibility and increased the amount of retail space. The corner, consequently, received the most elaborate decorative treatment and is embellished with an elegant low relief depicting an early motion picture camera set on a tripod. In 1915 Thomas Edison produced a short film in which the theater’s entrance is prominently featured. Filmed from across Broadway, it depicts groups of men, women, and children exiting the building. The second floor accommodated a large restaurant and ballroom, known under such names as the Broadway-Claremont or Clarendon Restaurant, and later, the Royal Palms Ballroom and Roof Garden. Until the early years of Depression, area residents gathered here to eat, drink, and dance. Beginning in the late 1920s, the storefronts were leased to automobile-related businesses and by 1933 the theater closed and the interior was converted to an automobile showroom. Despite such changes, the exterior is well-preserved and remains a symbol of the growing popularity of the motion picture in the early twentieth century.

DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS

Development of Manhattanville

Manhattanville is located in West Harlem, in the valley between Morningside and Washington Heights. The Claremont Theater building stands at the neighborhood’s northern boundary, at the southeast corner of Broadway and 135th Street.

In 1867 The Boulevard (now called Broadway) was straightened and extended to 155th Street along part of 11th Avenue. Where the street’s former route turned northeast, from 125th to 133rd Streets, it became known as “Old Broadway.” Significantly, the three-block section between 133rd Street and Diagonal Avenue (now Hamilton Place) was closed and subsequently absorbed into the block where the theater would be built. Alvin Higgins (1813-90), a carpet manufacturer and real estate speculator, acquired the site from John B. Lawrence in 1858. According to the New York Times, he followed the “example of Astors,” buying property “on the edges” and built a pier at the west end of 134th Street. Sold to Rebecca Mayer and Leonard Lewisohn in 1879, the property remained under their control until 1913.

In October 1904 the IRT subway began service along Broadway. The opening of underground stations at 137th and 145th Streets spurred rapid development in the area, except between 133rd and 135th Streets. Where the former route of the old Bloomingdale Road edged close to Broadway a series of irregularly-shaped parcels were created along the east side of the street. There was considerable disagreement concerning ownership of these vacant lots and it took at least nine months of litigation to “perfect the titles.” To acquire the site, in October 1913 the developers Arlington C. Hall & Harvey M. Hall promised to give the Hamilton (1911-12), an 85-unit apartment building at Riverside Drive and 114th Street, to Rebecca Mayer. This agreement paved the way for construction of the theater building.

Entertainment in Harlem

By the start of the twentieth century, numerous entertainment venues had opened on Harlem’s main commercial thoroughfares. These busy streets were well-served by public transit, particularly elevated railways, and later, subways. The first major theaters in Harlem were the Harlem Opera House

(J. B. McElfatrick, 1889, demolished) and the Columbus Theater (J. B. McElfatrick, 1890, demolished), both located on 125th Street. Neither proved to be a financial success and the opera house became a popular vaudeville theater, while the Columbus was used for minstrel, vaudeville, and variety shows. Subsequent theaters were often built as part of larger entertainment complexes. The Harlem Auditorium

(J. B. McElfatrick begun 1902, demolished), for instance, had 2,000 seats, a restaurant and roof garden; and the Audubon Theater (Thomas W. Lamb, 1912, altered) at Broadway and 165th Street, a 2,350 seat theater, ballroom, and retail space.

Harlem’s growth coincided with the development of the motion picture. Building upon the accomplishments of late nineteenth-century American and European inventors, Thomas A. Edison introduced the single-viewer kinetoscope in 1891 and the projecting vitascope at Koster & Bials Music Hall (demolished) on West 3

Claremont Theater Building

Claremont Theater Building
Harlem, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States

The Claremont Theater building is one of the oldest structures in New York City planned specifically to exhibit motion pictures, originally called “photoplays.” Located in north Manhattanville, at the southeast corner of Broadway and 135th Street, the theater opened in November 1914. Commissioned by Arlington C. Hall and Harvey

M. Hall of the Wayside Realty Company, it was designed in the neo-Renaissance style by Gaetano Ajello, an architect best-known for apartment buildings on Manhattan’s Upper West Side. The building has three distinct fronts, including a clipped corner facade where the auditorium’s entrance was originally located. This distinctive arrangement enhanced the theater’s visibility and increased the amount of retail space. The corner, consequently, received the most elaborate decorative treatment and is embellished with an elegant low relief depicting an early motion picture camera set on a tripod. In 1915 Thomas Edison produced a short film in which the theater’s entrance is prominently featured. Filmed from across Broadway, it depicts groups of men, women, and children exiting the building. The second floor accommodated a large restaurant and ballroom, known under such names as the Broadway-Claremont or Clarendon Restaurant, and later, the Royal Palms Ballroom and Roof Garden. Until the early years of Depression, area residents gathered here to eat, drink, and dance. Beginning in the late 1920s, the storefronts were leased to automobile-related businesses and by 1933 the theater closed and the interior was converted to an automobile showroom. Despite such changes, the exterior is well-preserved and remains a symbol of the growing popularity of the motion picture in the early twentieth century.

DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS

Development of Manhattanville

Manhattanville is located in West Harlem, in the valley between Morningside and Washington Heights. The Claremont Theater building stands at the neighborhood’s northern boundary, at the southeast corner of Broadway and 135th Street.

In 1867 The Boulevard (now called Broadway) was straightened and extended to 155th Street along part of 11th Avenue. Where the street’s former route turned northeast, from 125th to 133rd Streets, it became known as “Old Broadway.” Significantly, the three-block section between 133rd Street and Diagonal Avenue (now Hamilton Place) was closed and subsequently absorbed into the block where the theater would be built. Alvin Higgins (1813-90), a carpet manufacturer and real estate speculator, acquired the site from John B. Lawrence in 1858. According to the New York Times, he followed the “example of Astors,” buying property “on the edges” and built a pier at the west end of 134th Street. Sold to Rebecca Mayer and Leonard Lewisohn in 1879, the property remained under their control until 1913.

In October 1904 the IRT subway began service along Broadway. The opening of underground stations at 137th and 145th Streets spurred rapid development in the area, except between 133rd and 135th Streets. Where the former route of the old Bloomingdale Road edged close to Broadway a series of irregularly-shaped parcels were created along the east side of the street. There was considerable disagreement concerning ownership of these vacant lots and it took at least nine months of litigation to “perfect the titles.” To acquire the site, in October 1913 the developers Arlington C. Hall & Harvey M. Hall promised to give the Hamilton (1911-12), an 85-unit apartment building at Riverside Drive and 114th Street, to Rebecca Mayer. This agreement paved the way for construction of the theater building.

Entertainment in Harlem

By the start of the twentieth century, numerous entertainment venues had opened on Harlem’s main commercial thoroughfares. These busy streets were well-served by public transit, particularly elevated railways, and later, subways. The first major theaters in Harlem were the Harlem Opera House (J. B. McElfatrick, 1889, demolished) and the Columbus Theater (J. B. McElfatrick, 1890, demolished), both located on 125th Street. Neither proved to be a financial success and the opera house became a popular vaudeville theater, while the Columbus was used for minstrel, vaudeville, and variety shows. Subsequent theaters were often built as part of larger entertainment complexes. The Harlem Auditorium (J. B. McElfatrick begun 1902, demolished), for instance, had 2,000 seats, a restaurant and roof garden; and the Audubon Theater (Thomas W. Lamb, 1912, altered) at Broadway and 165th Street, a 2,350 seat theater, ballroom, and retail space.

Harlem’s growth coincided with the development of the motion picture. Building upon the accomplishments of late nineteenth-century American and European inventors, Thomas A. Edison introduced the single-viewer kinetoscope in 1891 and the projecting vitascope at Koster & Bials Music Hall (demolished) on West 34th Street

used theater drapes

Technical Theater for Nontechnical People
Completely updated to reflect state-of-the-art standards in today’s fast-changing theater technology, Technical Theater for Nontechnical People helps actors, dancers, playwrights, and directors to understand every aspect of a traditional and digitally supported backstage environment-from scenery, lighting, and sound to props, costumes, and stage management. All sides of production are clearly explained in jargon-free prose, and unfamiliar terms are highlighted and defined in an appended glossary. In addition to discussions on the more traditional elements of technical theater, this book gives equal weight to the new technologies that have become mainstream, including software (DMX, MIDI, and SMPTI) for show control systems, software to build audio cues, and PC-based audio play-back systems.

• Affirmed by Library Journal as a book that “will certainly become a standard introductory text on trchnical theater.”

• “The most down-to-earth, stright-forward survey of technical theater practice I have ever read.”–John R. Lucas, managing director of theater, Brown University

• This replaces 1-58115-020-2

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